BEING A STRONG LEADER: WHAT DOES IT MEAN? by Kgomotso Mopalami

SIX EFFECTIVE WAYS TO HAVE THAT DIFFICULT CONVERSATION AT WORK From: “The Conversation”
April 17, 2019
THE 2019 INTERNATIONAL WORKERS’ DAY CELEBRATIONS: AN SABPP PERSPECTIVE by Maphutha Diaz
May 1, 2019

A strong leader is defined as a person who takes responsibility for results; a person who will not stop or give up until the agreed goals have been achieved.  The incumbent is also characterised by high integrity, intellectual honesty, and humility combined with ambition.( https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-definition-of-a-strong-leader).  The well-known phrase says, “great leaders are born, but they can also be made”.  This challenges organisations to develop Its human capital, thus nurturing talent and ensuring necessary growth.  The question is, do organisations have future leadership strategy, to enable them to identify and nurture the talent they have? It is in the onus of Human Resources to ensure continuous development of individuals.  This can be achieved through various mean such as skills enhancement, personal development and on-going training. A study by Kornferry (https://www.kornferry.com/solutions/leadership-development) revealed that 55%  of organisations judge the ROI of their current leadership development as fair to very poor, and less than 20% are confident they have the leaders they need to deliver on strategic priorities.  The latter is an indication that there is still a lot to be done; and that’s developing future leaders, and not only leaders but those individuals who are capable and ready to face the future considering the rapid changes such as the 4IR and other awaited developments.   Such leaders need to be focused in the face of adversity.   It is also important to realise that the leader is not responsible for the job but for the people that are responsible for doing the job; sharing the success and being personally accountable for the failures; also, showing empathy to the person and not their position as work life is not autonomous of the personal (https://www.forbes.com/sites/jordandaykin/2018/09/18/being-a-great-leader/#708935e42eb9).

Organisations therefore, need to be cognisant that great leaders are  those who understand that they cannot work in silos but need to inculcate team-work.  There are some examples of leadership goals that we can learn from; those are:

Motivation: A good leader is someone who can motivate team members and let them know that they are appreciated and resected for the role they play

Sponsoring advancement: A true leader is one who identifies genuine opportunities and commit to sponsoring them.  This makes it possible for a company to achieve unprecedented advancements in their field

Investment in growth: A good leadercommits to growth and development. This can be achieved through long-term programs aimed at helping those they lead 

Creation of awareness or exposure: It is imperative for a leader to find avenues that will afford employees an exposure; thus, enhancing learning and development

Security: It is also imperative that a good leader strives to assure his/her followers of security. This could be security of tenure or security against any other threats that they may face.

Let us be the leaders who are goal-oriented and daring to succeed; not only for personal gain  but also for those we lead! 

References

https://www.reference.com/article/examples-leadership-goals-18cb11a56e04c791?aq=best+way+to+motivate+employees&qo=similarQuestions